GEORGIA O'KEEFE MYSTERY SWEATSHIRT

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GEORGIA O'KEEFE MYSTERY SWEATSHIRT

120.00

Georgia Totto O'Keeffe (November 15, 1887 – March 6, 1986) was an American artist. She was best known for her paintings of enlarged flowers, New York skyscrapers, and New Mexico landscapes. O'Keeffe has been recognized as the "Mother of American modernism".

JIMSON WEED: O'Keeffe was immensely fond of jimson weed, ignoring its seeds' toxicity and allowing it to flourish around her patio. She paid tribute to the bloom in this painting, originally entitled Miracle Flower. Jimson Weed was commissioned by cosmetics magnate Elizabeth Arden for the new Gymnasium Moderne of her Fifth Avenue Salon in New York City. Placed in the exercise room, the unfurling blossoms were meant to encourage clients in their stretches. Arden paid the exorbitant sum of $10,000 for the largest floral composition O'Keeffe would ever create.

1924: She painted her first large-scale flower painting, Petunia, No. 2, in 1924 that was first exhibited in 1925. Making magnified depictions of objects imbued a sense of awe and emotional intensity.Alfred Stieglitz, an art dealer and photographer, held an exhibit of her works in 1917. She moved to New York in 1918 at Stieglitz's request and began working seriously as an artist. They developed a professional relationship—he promoted and exhibited her works—and a personal relationship that led to their marriage in 1924.O'Keeffe was the muse Stieglitz had always wanted. He photographed O'Keeffe obsessively between 1918 and 1925 in what was the most prolific period in his entire life. During this period he produced more than 350 mounted prints of O'Keeffe that portrayed a wide range of her character, moods and beauty.

GHOST RANCH: In the 1940s, O'Keeffe made an extensive series of paintings of what is called the "Black Place", about 150 miles west of her Ghost Ranch house.O'Keeffe then spent part of nearly every year working in New Mexico. She collected rocks and bones from the desert floor and made them and the distinctive architectural and landscape forms of the area subjects in her work.She often talked about her fondness for Ghost Ranch and Northern New Mexico, as in 1943, when she explained: "Such a beautiful, untouched lonely feeling place, such a fine part of what I call the 'Faraway'. It is a place I have painted before ... even now I must do it again."

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